Who is Ali Bongo—The President on Spot over ‘Election Fraud’ in Gabon

0

Ali Bongo Ondimba (born Alain Bernard Bongo; 9 February 1959) is son of late Gabonese president Omar Bongo, who ruled the oil-rich African Country from 1967 until his death in 2009.

Being conceived 18 months before his father Albert-Bernard Bongo (later Omar Bongo Ondimba) marriage to and Josephine Kama (later Patience Dabany), Ali is widely rumored to be Bongo’s adopted son, a claim that he dismisses.

After studying law, he entered politics, joining his father’s Gabonese Democratic Party (PDG). Ali was elected to the PDG Central Committee at the party’s Third Extraordinary Congress in March 1983.

Subsequently he was his father’s Personal Representative to the PDG and in that capacity he entered the PDG Political Bureau in 1984. He was then elected to the Political Bureau at an ordinary party congress in September 1986

Bongo held the post of High Personal Representative of the President of the Republic from 1987 to 1989. In 1989, his father appointed him to the government as Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, replacing Martin Bongo, a nephew of President Omar Bongo.

He was considered a reformist within the ruling PDG in the early 1990s. In the 1990 parliamentary election (the first election after the introduction of multiparty politics), he was elected to the National Assembly as a PDG candidate in Haut-Ogooué Province.

After two years as Foreign Minister, a 1991 constitutional amendment setting a minimum age of 35 for ministers resulted in his departure from the government.

Following his departure from the government, Bongo took up his seat as a Deputy in the National Assembly in 1991. In February 1992, he organized a visit by American pop singer Michael Jackson to Gabon.[10]

Bongo help position of President of the Higher Council of Islamic Affairs of Gabon (Conseil supérieur des affaires islamiques du Gabon, CSAIG) in 1996.

Prior to the December 1996 parliamentary election, a supporter of Defense Minister Idriss Ngari challenged Bongo for the PDG nomination to his parliamentary seat, but Bongo was successful in winning the nomination and retaining the seat. In surviving that challenge, he benefited from the assistance of his maternal uncle Jean-Boniface Assélé, one of his key political allies.

After over seven years as a Deputy, Bongo was appointed to the government as Minister of National Defense on 25 January 1999.

In the December 2001 parliamentary election, Bongo was elected to the National Assembly as a PDG candidate in Haut-Ogooué Province.  At the PDG’s Eighth Ordinary Congress in July 2003, he was elected as party Vice-President of the PDG. During the 2005 presidential election, he worked on his father’s re-election campaign as Coordinator-General of Youth.

Following that election, he was promoted to the rank of Minister of State on 21 January 2006, while retaining the defense portfolio.

Bongo was re-elected to the National Assembly in the December 2006 parliamentary election as a PDG candidate in Haut-Ogooué Province. He retained his post as Minister of State for National Defense after that election, although he was subsequently reduced to the rank of ordinary Minister on 28 December 2007.

At the PDG’s Ninth Ordinary Congress in September 2008, he was re-elected as a Vice-President of the PDG.

Omar Bongo died at a Spanish hospital on 8 June 2009. Ali Bongo appeared on television that night to call “for calm and serenity of heart and reverence to preserve the unity and peace so dear to our late father”

The degree of support for Ali Bongo within the PDG leadership was also questioned in the press, and it was argued that many Gabonese “see him as a spoilt child, born in Congo-Brazzaville, brought up in France, hardly able to speak indigenous languages and with the appearance of a hip hop star”.

Bongo was one of ten candidates who submitted applications to become the PDG’s candidate in the early presidential election, scheduled for 30 August 2009.

A few days after the election on 30 August 2009, it was announced that he had won the election with 42% of the vote, and that result was promptly confirmed by the Constitutional Court. The opposition rejected the official results, and riots broke out in Gabon’s second largest city, Port-Gentil.

In response to allegations of fraud, the Constitutional Court conducted a recount before again declaring Bongo the winner with 41.79% of the vote on 12 October 2009; he was then sworn in as President on 16 October.

Ali Bongo married to the French-born Sylvia Najma Valentin. she is the daughter of Édouard Valentin, CEO of the Omnium gabonais d’assurances et de réassurances (OGAR) insurance company.
Source: Wikipedia